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for this evening's program. they will be seen at a later date. tonight gun control and technology when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. rose: one month has passed since the massacre at sandy hook elementary school where a gunman fatally shot 20 children and six adults. the tragedy has reignited a debate about gun violence in america. today president obama announced new measures for improving gun control. >> this is our first task as a society: keeping our children safe. this is how we will be judged. and their voices should compel us to change and that's why last month i asked joe to lead an effort, along with members of my cabinet to come up with some concrete steps we can take right now to keep our children safe. to help prevent mass shootings. to reduce the broader epidemic of gun violence in this country. and we can't put this off any longer. >> rose: his 23 executive actions are being called the largest reform proposal on guns in a generation. he called for expanded background checks, a renewed ban on assault wea
is the technology expert at barrango corporation of south san francisco, california, a preeminent player in the $2 billion-a-year visual merchandising business. >> we create props, decorations, displays for stores, shopping malls, amusement parks, any commercial properties. >> reporter: this all started right after the san francisco earthquake. a newly-arrived italian immigrant named barrango, a sculptor by trade, started making mannequins, the most lifelike anyone had ever seen. but it turns out the real gold was in holiday displays, and, for over 100 years, barrango has been manufacturing them and classic carosels for retailers around the country and the world, from boston to burbank, from berlin to beijing. yes, they ship to china, but they don't make it there. >> we've had the opportunity to go to china and have things manufactured, but we're a quality, hands-on family, company, and we need it to be in america in order to produce what we've got. we can't just turn it over to production in another country. >> reporter: it is that quality- first mantra, along with its global reach, that squired
more powerful, they're also more fuel efficient and loaded with new technology. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: if 2012 was the year of the fuel efficient "green car," 2013 is shaping up to be the year of the truck. the big three-- gm, ford and chrysler-- all are out with new 2013 models or concept pickups that will start hitting showrooms over the next few years. the three are fierce competitors in the full-size pickup segment where profit margins are larger compared to cars. jeffries auto analyst peter nesvold says automakers make $12,000 to $15,000 in profit for each full-size truck they sell. >> to put that into perspective, small cars might be anywhere from $2,000 to maybe $4,000. so when you get that shift towards trucks, that's quite powerful to earnings. >> reporter: g.m. has two new models, the chevy silverado and g.m.c. sierra. >> the truck margins are still certainly strong for us; they continue to be for the entire industry. and with this new truck, that'll be no different, but it's still a great value for the customer. >> reporter: even with the higher margins, buyers
's decision to upgrade the hydraulics and other mechanical systems with next-generation technology that runs on electricity. >> you've got generators on board the aircraft that are powering the systems directly with electricity. that, of course, means a lot more juice is flowing through the plane. it also means you need more powerful batteries as backup systems. >> reporter: investigators from the federal aviation administration and national transportation safety board are working with their counterparts in japan to try to determine whether a manufacturing defect caused the battery in an all nippon airways 787 to burn up. if that proves to be the case, boeing may find the fix is straight forward. but if the problem is the lithium battery technology itself, boeing faces a more difficult engineering challenge. >> lithium ion batteries have a lot of power and of course there are many types of batteries out there and hopefully a substitute can be found, but nothing is absolutely set in stone at this point. >> reporter: boeing might be able to design a container to prevent or protect fires caused
the broader technology landscape, for how much it is people are accessing the internet through mobile devices, and that has been very substantial. but for ebay, the impact on this on the holiday shopping season, was on black monday, the monday after thanksgiving, you had volumes through ebay's mobile app were up three times, year-over-year, and through paypal, their payment, the mobile app there so volumes up two times, just for that one day alone. these numbers were better than the 120% increase discussed for the year as a whole. and certainly auger for n])jñ you could see in the course of 2013. >> susie: what does all of this mean for ebay stock? in 2012 it had a terrific year, the shares were up 75%. after this earnings report, the shares were up about 1% in after-hours trading. what is your ranking on the stock? >> our ranking on the stock is it is trading pretty much at a premium to its growth rate. we haven't seen anything coming out of guidance from the company to say they're raising that growth rate ap appreciationably. and we're more interested in the stock if it pulls back a little
that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: algeria's state news agency now says special forces have completed a mission to rescue dozens of foreign hostages, including some americans. they'd been held by militants tied to al-qaeda. but there are wildly varying accounts of how many got out alive, and how many were killed. >> because of the fluidity and the fact that there is a lot of planning going on, i cannot give you any further details at this time about the current situation on the ground. >> brown: even this afternoon, as secretary of state hillary clinton suggested, the situation in algeria remained confused. the focus was this natural gas compound in the sahara desert seen here in footage from last month. the vast, natu
the stock. but are you also not a fan, a real fan of technology. why not? >> well, look, we look at a few things when we make our recommendations, susie. we look at the the achieve ability. are the estimates achievable. i think for tech its tough right now. a lot of the conditions in the economy are slow. it spending is to the really that great. so i don't know if the estimates are that achievable. i also think that yeah, better risk/reward in other sectors in the market. we're trying to advise our clients how to outperform the s&p. i think there is better opportunity. within tech there are some things we like where recommending suck stocks for example. i think that is one economically sensitive area that the stocks haven't participated that much in the rally. >> susie: let's talk about the areas that have been telling your clients, morgan stanley clients which direction to go. you have three big themes for your clients. buy stocks with from american companies with exposure to china, positive on china. buy dividend paying stocks and you like very large stocks, what you call megastocks. wh
tech executive who served as chief technology officer for president obama's reelection campaign. welcome, harper. >> hello. >> hello. >> we spent a year talking about the role of social media in the campaign. how important were twitter, facebook, and +*eupbs gram to e campaign? >> well, it was -- it's interesting to look at 2008 versus 2012. because in 2008 things were just starting -- >> pelley: . >> they were new toys. >> people weren't using them. i like to say like my mom wasn't using them, you know? as more people use these, as more people -- america starts using these they're incredibly important, as you can imagine. >> and are they important because when you get friends or followers on facebook or twitter or tumble -r, amplifying the campaign's message, is that better than hearing it from a politician? >> i think it's more genuine. if i share with you and you're friends on facebook you listen to what i'm saying a little bit more than someone who's far aware shares to you. we see that -- i think it's the same thing as it always has been, which is it's much easier for me t
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. facebook wants you to think graphical. the social networking powerhouse takes the wraps off a new way to track your friends. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. good evening. what does that new tool mean for facebook investors? we ask technology analyst scott kessler. >> tom: and the comeback in housing could be a boon for truck sales. how u.s. automakers are getting ready for a pickup in pickup sales. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." on early economic numbers as well as from the corporate corner. we'll have more on facebook and its big announcement coming up in a moment. over all, stocks were lower with
energy producer and largest producer of calories, producer of calories, of food, the technology development, overwhelmingly based in the u.s. our demographics are pretty good, housing is picking up, we have a lot of money, this doesn't speak well for unemployment in the u.s. and doesn't speak well well for a lot of people doing the way they used to our their kids but in terms of looking at the united states, our risk wasn't called the u.s., the risk was called washington politics, the problem is it is precisely that relative comfort that allows washington to shrink into the miasma it continues to. >> rose: japan is the jibs. >> the jibs. >> it is kind of interesting, right after i say the united states is doing well, we have a situation with america's key allies in the three most important regions of the world to us are actually under a lot of stress. >> rose: really? >> and there are really three things happening in world that matter right now geo politically, one is china is rising, one is middle east is exploding and the third is europe is muddling through, and those three th
. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington and the nation were witness again today to the quadrennial pomp and color of a presidential inauguration. it marked the public start to the second obama administration, and it featured presidential appeals to extend prosperity and full freedoms to all americans. as the sun rose over the nation's capital on this monday hundreds of thousands of people began descending on the national mall to witness the occasion. officials estimated 500-700,000 attendees. that was far fewer than four years ago when nearly two million turned out. but today's crowd gave no hint of diminished enthusiasm for the 44th president after a first term that saw bruising battles over health care, financial reform, deficits and spending an
satellite in orbit. the u.s. has said it was actually a test of long-range missile technology. the u.n. resolution demands the north halt plans for further launches and abandon nuclear weapons work once and for all. u.s. trade representative ron kirk will step down next month. the former dallas mayor announced his intentions in a statement today. he gave no indication today of what he'll do next or who will succeed him. and on wall street, stocks rallied again. the dow jones industrial average gained 62 points to close at 13,712. the nasdaq rose eight points to close above 3143. and still to come on the newshour, the elections in israel; evidence of concussions in retired football players; "roe v. wade" and a landmark ruling 40 years on. >> brown: now, to israel, as election results come in tonight, prime minister benjamin netanyahu appears to be on his way to another term in office. but as margaret warner reports, his next government could look quite different from his last. >> warner: the prime minister's victory came as no surprise as the leader had a significant lead the polls he
that have yet to go public in that space will do so. >> reporter: there are also several big technology companies that investors hope will go public. one is twitter. although many i.p.o. experts don't think that will happen this year. another possibility is square--a mobile payments company founded by the man who created twitter. and, finally dropbox, a web- based file hosting service. but, it's understandable that many companies are approaching the i.p.o. market cautiously. they're wary of becoming the next facebook with a stock price that's still well below may's offering price. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: it took a long time for norwegian cruise lines to make the big decision to go public. since the 1990's, it attempted several times to do an i.p.o., but pulled back. when i talked with c.e.o. kevin sheehan today, i asked him why he felt that the time was finally right. >> it's always a lot of pluses and minuses of being a public company, as you know, but at some point, we needed to take this step. and we thought this was the perfect time, you know, washington resolved
and the other one which will allow evidence which is technology oriented. to be used as evidence so we are changing all of that. now these are fault lines which exist and we are trying very fast to fill those fault lines. >> you would be surprised, for instance, i'm talking about the judicial system for instance that the number of prisoners who were taken in after the swat operation where the military was operating, and the military lost os soldiers, and you know, its fight t if the numbers who were apprehended were about 2,000, i think less than 10 or maybe in 20 were prosecuted, were you know, enough evidence was seen to be available within the courts that they prex cuted in so you can imagine how big the gap is and therefore we are changing the laws. >> rose: nor do i forget the fact that the movement that sort of tlofer through musharraf in the beginning was about judges and the independence of judges, am i right or wrong. >> rose: . >> yes, we call it the lawyer's movement. >> rose: exactly right, yeah. >> but the political parties had a role to play, you know that. >> rose: of co
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)